Govt. License No. 2046
 

 

 

 

Tirich Mir

Overview
Elevation (feet) 25282
Elevation (meters) 7706
Range Central Asia Ranges
Country Pakistan
Continent Asia
Latitude 36.25
Longitude 71.8333
Difficulty Major Mountain Expedition
Best months for climbing June, July, August, September
Year first climbed 1950
Convenient Center Chitral, Pakistan
Nearest major airport Peshawar, Pakistan
Description

Tirich Mir is the highest mountain in the Hindu Kush. It is a cluster of rocky, ice-covered pyramids, located due south of the second highest peak, Noshaq. Tirich Mir is south of the range's main crest, and projects entirely into Pakistan, whereas much of the Hindu Kush marks the Pakistan-Afghanistan border.



Noshaq

Overview
Elevation (feet) 24581
Elevation (meters) 7492
Range Central Asia Ranges
Country Afghanistan
Continent Asia
Latitude 36.4333
Longitude 71.9
Difficulty Major Mountain Expedition
Best months for climbing June, July, August, September
Year first climbed 1960
Convenient Center Chitral, Pakistan
Nearest major airport Peshawar, Pakistan
Description

Noshaq is the highest mountain in Afghanistan, and the second highest mountain in the Hindu Kush. It rises just north of the Pakistan border, and just north of the the highest mountain in the range, Tirich Mir (25,282 ft.). Noshaq's summit crest supports several high peaks. Its ascent is straightforward, and its numerous successful ascents include the first winter ascent of a high Asian mountain, achieved by a Polish expedition in February 1973.



Gasherbrum IV

Overview
Elevation (feet) 26000
Elevation (meters) 7925
Range Central Asia Ranges
Country Pakistan/China
Continent Asia
Difficulty Major Mountain Expedition
Best months for climbing July, August
Convenient Center Askole
Nearest major airport Islamabad, Pakistan
Description

Lowest of the 4 Gasherbrum-peaks. Gasherbrum 4 is sometimes referred to as the most beautiful peak in the Karakoram. For more information, see also Gasherbrum.



Gasherbrum

Overview
Elevation (feet) 26470
Elevation (meters) 8068
Range Central Asia Ranges
Country Pakistan
Continent Asia
Latitude 35.7167
Longitude 76.7
Difficulty Major Mountain Expedition
Best months for climbing July, August
Year first climbed 1958
Convenient Center Askole
Nearest major airport Islamabad, Pakistan
Description

Gasherbrum is a remote group of high peaks in the Karakoram, located at the northeast end of the 36-mile Baltoro glacier. The group forms a semi-circle around its own South Gasherbrum Glacier. The peaks are sharp rock pyramids with rugged ridges and steep, towering walls. The highest peak, Gasherbrum I, is also known as Hidden Peak, a name given it by William Martin Conway in 1892 in reference to its extreme remoteness. Three of the Gasherbrum massif's high peaks are over 8,000 meters. Gasherbrum I is the world's eleventh highest peak, Broad Peak is the twelfth highest, and Gasherbrum II is the thirteenth highest.



Gasherbrum II

Overview
Elevation (feet) 26360
Elevation (meters) 8035
Range Central Asia Ranges
Country Pakistan
Continent Asia
Latitude 35.75
Longitude 76.65
Difficulty Major Mountain Expedition
Best months for climbing July, August
Year first climbed 1956
Convenient Center Askole
Nearest major airport Islamabad, Pakistan
Description

Gasherbrum II is the third highest peak of the Gasherbrum massif, and the thirteenth highest peak in the world. It is generally considered one of the easiest 8000 meter peaks, though like any mountain of its stature, an ascent is not to be taken lightly.



Broad Peak

Overview
Elevation (feet) 26400
Elevation (meters) 8047
Range Central Asia Ranges
Country Pakistan
Continent Asia
Difficulty Major Mountain Expedition
Best months for climbing June, July, August
Year first climbed 1957
Nearest major airport Islamabad, Pakistan
Description

Broad Peak is located approximately five miles from K2 along the Baltoro glacier. Enroute to base camp for Broad Peak, the twelfth highest mountain in the world, climbers and trekkers alike can visit the Gasherbrums, the Trangos, K2, and Chogolisa. On a good day, both Chogolisa and K2 can be seen from the upper reaches as well as from base camp of this extraordinary mountain. It's name was originally set as K3, as in the third mountain measured in the Karakoram range, right after the famed K2. But when on-lookers later viewed the peak in closer detail, they discovered that its summit was over a mile long, and hence the name Broad Peak.



K-2 (Karakorum - 2)

Overview
Elevation (feet) 28253
Elevation (meters) 8612
Range Central Asia Ranges
Country Pakistan
Continent Asia
Latitude 35.8833
Longitude 76.5167
Difficulty Major Mountain Expedition
Best months for climbing June, July, August
Year first climbed 1954
Convenient Center Skardu, Pakistan
Nearest major airport Islamabad, Pakistan
Description

K2 is the second highest mountain in the world, and is thought by many climbers to be the ultimate climb. Its giant pyramid peak towers in isolation, 12,000 feet above the wide Concordia glacial field at the head of the Baltoro Glacier. The sheer icy summit is flanked by six equally steep ridges. Each of its faces presents a maze of precipices and overhangs. K2 was long considered unclimbable. Attempts in 1902, 1909, 1934, 1938, 1939 and 1953 all failed. The first successful ascent in 1954 started with over 500 porters, 11 climbers, and six scientists. One of the climbers died of pneumonia after 40 days of raging storms. The final ascent was made by a team of two after their oxygen supply had run out, and an emergency descent was made in darkness. K2 is the only major mountain in the world which has surveyor's notation as its common name (K stands for Karakoram, 2 means it was the second peak listed). T.G. Montgomery was the surveyor who assigned the peak this designation in 1856. The mountain's remoteness had rendered it invisible from any inhabited place, so apart from an occasional local reference as Chogori (meaning Great Mountain), it had no other name prior to Montgomery's survey. Since that time, the name Mount Godwin-Austen has occasionally been used, in honor of the man who directed the survey. For the most part, however, K2 has been the name of choice, and has even evolved into Ketu, the name used by the Balti people who act as porters in the region. Additional information added by Stephen Burke: With respect to the commentary on the 1954 Italian expedition that was the first to summit K2, it has since been proven that Compagnoni and Lacedelli did indeed have oxygen until they reached the summit of K2. The myth was dispelled through libel proceedings brought on by climber Walter Bonatti, who had been accused of sabotaging the expedition by keeping the oxygen for himself. The best evidence available in translated format can be found in the latest edition of The Mountains of My Life by Bonatti, or the short book entitled Trial on K2.



Chogolisa

Overview
Elevation (feet) 25147
Elevation (meters) 7665
Range Central Asia Ranges
Country Pakistan
Continent Asia
Latitude 35.1167
Longitude 76.5833
Difficulty Major Mountain Expedition
Best months for climbing July, August
Year first climbed 1975
Convenient Center Askole
Nearest major airport Islamabad
Description

Chogolisa is a high snow peak with a distinctive long, almost level summit ridge, located about 15km southwest of the Gasherbrum group, near the head of the Baltoro Glacier. The Southwest summit is higher; the slightly lower Northeast summit (7554m) was named Bride Peak by Martin Conway in 1892, and was climbed in 1958 by the Japanese team of M. Fujihara and K. Hirai. Famed Austrian mountaineer Hermann Buhl died here in a cornice collapse in 1957.



Masherbrum

Overview
Elevation (feet) 25660
Elevation (meters) 7821
Range Central Asia Ranges
Country Pakistan
Continent Asia
Latitude 35.7167
Longitude 76.3
Difficulty Major Mountain Expedition
Best months for climbing July, August, September
Year first climbed 1960
Convenient Center Skardu, Pakistan
Nearest major airport Islamabad, Pakistan
Description

Masherbrum is a spectacular rock and ice peak, rising to the south of the Baltoro Glacier. The summit's sheer north face is a perfect pyramid, with steep narrow ridges rising suddenly to a sharp pinnacle.



Spantik Peak

Overview
Elevation (feet) 23054
Elevation (meters) 7027
Range Central Asia Ranges
Country Pakistan
Continent Asia
Difficulty Major Mountain Expedition
Best months for climbing June, July, August, September
Convenient Center Skardu
Nearest major airport Skardu air port
Description
Please visit our website for more info. www.jasminetours.com.


Batura

Overview
Elevation (feet) 25574
Elevation (meters) 7795
Range Central Asia Ranges
Country Pakistan
Continent Asia
Latitude 36.5
Longitude 74.5167
Difficulty Major Mountain Expedition
Best months for climbing June, July, August, September
Year first climbed 1976
Nearest major airport Islamabad
Description

The Batura Muztagh rises to the west of the Hunza Valley, forming the westernmost extension of the Karakoram Range. The highest peaks form a formidable massif called the Batura Wall, toward the western end of the range. East of the Wall several other massifs rise, notably Passu Massiv, Shispar, and Bojohagur Duanasir/Ultar. There is a fine map of the range, with route notes, made by Jerzy Wala, and published in 1988.



Kuk Sar Peak Passu Batura

Overview
Elevation (feet) 21981
Elevation (meters) 6700
Range Central Asia Ranges
Country Pakistan
Continent Asia
Difficulty Technical Climb
Best months for climbing June, July, August, September
Year first climbed 1986
Convenient Center Passu
Nearest major airport Islamabad / Gilgit
Description
This peak is in Batura valley in Hunza. Trekking start from Passu village.


Sia Kangri

Overview
Elevation (feet) 24350
Elevation (meters) 7422
Range Central Asia Ranges
Country Pakistan
Continent Asia
Latitude 35.6667
Longitude 76.7667
Difficulty Major Mountain Expedition
Best months for climbing July August, September
Year first climbed 1934
Convenient Center Skardu
Nearest major airport Islamabad
Description

Sia Kangri is a huge snowy mountain with many high peaks rising from its curved summit ridge. It rises at the junction of China, India, and Pakistan, though in this region the border between the latter two countries is in dispute. The mountain is well glaciated, its snowy crest rising above a vast, barren landscape of deep, rocky canyons.



Great Trango Tower

Overview
Elevation (feet) 20623
Elevation (meters) 6286
Range Central Asia Ranges
Country Pakistan
Continent Asia
Difficulty Major Mountain Expedition
Year first climbed 1977
Convenient Center Rawalpindi or Skardu
Nearest major airport Islamabad/Rawalpindi
Description

Great Trango is situated in the Trango group in Pakistan�Baltoro Glacier region, one of the most remarkable mountain settings on earth. The climbing route is deceptively straightforward, ascending from the Trango glacier to the summit of Great Trango. The climbing is only moderately technical making this expedition an ideal first foray to higher altitudes or simply a wonderful experience for climbers wanting a taste of the best that the Himalaya can offer without the extreme altitude.



Muztagh Tower

Overview
Elevation (feet) 23860
Elevation (meters) 7273
Range Central Asia Ranges
Country Pakistan
Continent Asia
Latitude 35.8333
Longitude 76.3667
Difficulty Major Mountain Expedition
Best months for climbing July, August, September
Year first climbed 1956
Convenient Center Skardu, Pakistan
Nearest major airport Rawalpindi, Pakistan
Description

Muztagh Tower, as the name implies, is an enormous rock tower, its four sides stretching steeply into the sky. This is perhaps the most difficult technical climb in the Karakoram. It is located between the basins of the Baltoro and Sarpo Laggo glaciers, and for many years was considered inaccessible. Its faces are covered in ice and hanging glaciers, and there is considerable overhang. The British party who made the first successful ascent barely preceded a French party who was simultaneously attempting the peak from the opposite side. Neither party knew of the other's presence until the French team, en route to what they believed would be a first ascent, spotted someone else standing on the summit.



 

Nanga Parbat

Overview
Elevation (feet) 26658
Elevation (meters) 8125
Range Himalaya
Country Pakistan
Continent Asia
Latitude 35.2333
Longitude 74.6
Difficulty Major Mountain Expedition
Best months for climbing June, July, August, September
Year first climbed 1953
Convenient Center Chilas, Pakistan
Nearest major airport Rawalpindi, Pakistan
Description

Nanga Parbat, whose name means Naked Mountain, is the ninth highest mountain in the world, and the westernmost mountain of the Himalayas. Its vast snowy face is a powerful spectacle when seen from the arid Indus Valley, approaching the mountain from the west. Here the mountain towers in isolation over 22,000 feet from the valley floor. The mountain is easy to reach (China's Karakorum Highway approaches the base of the mountain from the north), but is not so easy to climb. Unstable glaciers and frequent storms and avalanches have proved hazardous, most notably to the German party who first attempted the peak. Herman Buhl successfully reached the summit, but this was only after having lost eleven climbers and fifteen porters during the ascent. Many other climbers have subsequently been killed on this mountain.

Climbing History

Climbing attempts started very early on Nanga Parbat. In 1895 Albert F. Mummery led an expedition to the peak, and reached almost 7000m on the Diamir (West) Face, but Mummery and two Gurkha companions later died reconnoitering the Rakhiot Face.

Six German expeditions attempted the peak in the 1930's, but none succeeded, and dozens of climbers died in storms and avalanches. However, an altitude of about 7700m was reached on the East Ridge, attained via the Rakhiot Face.

Nanga Parbat was first climbed on July 3, 1953 by Austrian climber Hermann Buhl, a member of a German-Austrian team. By the time of this expedition, 31 people had already died trying to make the first ascent. The final push for the summit was dramatic: Buhl continued alone after his companions had turned back, and spent a night standing up on the descent. Buhl is the only mountaineer to have made the first ascent of an eight-thousander solo (at least at the summit) and without oxygen.

The second ascent of Nanga Parbat was via the Diamir Face, in 1962, by Germans Toni Kinshofer, S. Löw, and A. Mannhardt. This route is now the "standard route" on the mountain. The Kinshofer route does not ascend the middle of the Diamir Face, which is threatened by avalanches from massive hanging glaciers. Instead it climbs a buttress on the left side of the face.

In 1970 Reinhold and Günther Messner reached the summit via a direct route on the huge, difficult Rupal Face; this was the third ascent of the mountain. Their descent was epic: they were unable to descend their ascent route, and instead made the first traverse of the mountain, going down the Diamir Face. Unfortunately Günther was killed in an avalanche on the Diamir. (Messner's account of this incident was disputed, and cast a further shadow over this achievement. However, in 2005 Günther's remains were found on the Diamir Face, corroborating Reinhold's story.)

In 1978 Reinhold Messner returned to the Diamir Face and achieved the first completely solo ascent (i.e. always solo above Base Camp) of an 8000m peak.

Among other ascents of the peak, the 1985 ascent by Jerzy Kukuczka et al stands out. They climbed a bold line up the Southeast Pillar (or Polish Spur) on the right-hand side of the Rupal Face.

Recently some well-known climbers have been attempting very quick ascents of the Rupal Face. In particular, late summer of 2005 was a busy time on the face. In August, Pakistani military helicopters rescued renowned Slovenian mountaineer Tomaž Humar, who was stuck under a narrow ice ledge at 5900 metres for six days. It is believed to be one of the few successful rescues carried out at such high altitude. In September, Vince Anderson and noted alpinist Steve House did an extremely lightweight, fast ascent of a new, direct route on the face, earning high praise from the climbing community.

On the 17th or 18th of July 2006, José Antonio Delgado Sucre, an elite high altitude climber from Venezuela, died a few days after making the summit, where he was caught by bad weather for 6 straight days and was not able to make his way down. He was the only Venezuelan climber, and one of the few Latin Americans, to have summated five eight-thousanders.


Rakaposhi 7788

Rakaposhi is a mountain in the Karakoram mountain range. It is situated in the Nagar valley approximately 100 km north of the city of Gilgit. Rakaposhi means "shining wall" in the local language. Rakaposhi is also known as Rakaposhi Peak, Rakapushi and Dumani ("Mother of Mist"). It is ranked 27th highest in the world and 12th highest in Pakistan, but it is more popular for its beauty than its rank might suggest and is said to be one of the most beautiful mountains in the world.

Rakaposhi was first climbed in 1958 by Mike Banks and Tom Patey, members of a British-Pakistani expedition, via the Southwest Spur/Ridge route. Both of them suffered minor frostbite during the ascent. Another climber slipped and fell on the descent and died during the night.

Rakaposhi is notable for its exceptional rise over local terrain, almost unmatched in the world. For example, it rises 6000m in only 16.5km horizontal distance from the Hunza River. There are magnificent views of Rakaposhi from the Karakoram Highway on the route through Hunza. A tourist spot in the town of Ghulmat (located in the Nagar Valley) called "Zero Point of Rakaposhi" is the closest convenient view point of the mountain.

Climbing History

• 1892 Martin Conway explores the south side of Rakaposhi.
• 1938 M. Vyvyan and R. Campbell Secord make the first reconnaissance and climb a north-western forepeak (about 5,800m/19,000') via the northwest ridge.
• 1947 Secord returns with H. W. Tilman and two Swiss climbers; they ascend via the Gunti glacier to 5,800m/19,000' on the south-west spur.
• 1954 Cambridge University team, led by Alfred Tissières, attempts the peak via the south-west spur but only reached 6,340m/20,800'. Also, an Austro-German expedition led by Mathias Rebitsch attempted the same route.
• 1956 A British-American expedition, led by Mike Banks, reaches 7,163m/23,500' on the Southwest Ridge, above the Gunti glacier.
• 1958 The first ascent, noted above.
• 1964 An Irish expedition attempts the long and difficult Northwest Ridge.
• 1971 Karl Herrligkofer leads an attempt on the elegant but difficult North Spur (or North Ridge).
• 1973 Herrligkofer returns to the North Spur but is again unsuccessful due to time and weather problems.
• 1979 A Polish-Pakistani expedition ascends the Northwest Ridge from the Biro Glacier. Also, a Japanese expedition from Waseda University, led by Eiho Ohtani, succeeds in climbing the North Spur. Summit party: Ohtani and Matsushi Yamashita. This ascent was expedition-style, done over a period of six weeks, with 5000m of fixed rope.
• 1984 A Canadian team achieves a semi-alpine-style ascent of the North Spur, using much less fixed rope than the Japanese team had. Summit party: Barry Blanchard, David Cheesmond, Kevin Doyle.
• 1985-1987 Various unsuccessful attempts on the long East Ridge.
• 1986 A Dutch team climbs a variation of the Northwest Ridge route.
• 1995 An ascent via the Northwest Ridge.
• 1997 An ascent via the Southwest Spur/Ridge (possibly the original route).
• 2000 An attempt from the East side (Bagrot Glacier).


 

Distaghil Sar

Overview
Elevation (feet) 25,869
Elevation (meters) 7,885
Range Karakorum
Country Pakistan
Continent Asia
Year first climbed 1960 by an Austrian team
Easiest route glacier/snow/ice climb
Description

Distaghil Sar is a mountain in the Hispar Muztagh range in the Karakoram region of Northern Areas of Pakistan or Gilgit-Baltistan. It is the 19th highest mountain on earth and the ninth highest peak in Pakistan.

Distaghil Sar was first climbed in 1960 by G. Starker and D. Marchart of an Austrian expedition led by Wolfgang Stefan.

 

Khunyang Chhish

Overview
Elevation (feet) 25,761
Elevation (meters) 7,852
Range Hispar Muztagh, Karakoram
Country Pakistan
Continent Asia
Year first climbed August 26, 1971 by Zygmunt Heinrich, Jan Stryczynski, Ryszard Szafirski
Easiest route glacier / rock / Ice climb
Description

Khunyang Chhish or Kunyang Chhish is the second-highest mountain in the Hispar Muztagh, a subrange of the Karakoram mountains of Pakistan. Alternate variations of the name include Kunyang Kish and Khiangyang Kish, among others. Its height is also sometimes given as 7823m. It is ranked 21st in the world and 8th in Pakistan.

 

Kanjut Sar

Overview
Elevation (feet) 25,460
Elevation (meters) 7,760
Range Karakoram
Country Pakistan
Continent Asia
Year first climbed 1959 by Guido Monzino
Easiest route snow / Ice climb
Description

Kanjut Sar is a Himalayan mountain located in the Hispar Muztagh region of the Karakoram range. It is the 26th highest mountain on earth and the 11th highest in Pakistan.

Kanjut Sar consists of two peaks:

  • Kanjut Sar I at 7,760 metres (25,460 feet). Ranked 26th in the world.

  • Kanjut Sar II at 6,181 metres (20,279 feet).


 

Trivor

Overview
Elevation (feet) 24,859
Elevation (meters) 7,577
Range Hispar Muztagh
Country Pakistan
Continent Asia
Year first climbed 1960 by Wilfrid Noyce, Jack Sadler (British/US)
Easiest route Northwest Ridge: glacier / snow / ice climb
Description

Trivor is one of the high peaks of the Hispar Muztagh, a subrange of the Karakoram range in the Northern Areas of Pakistan. Its height is often given as 7,728 metres, but this elevation is not consistent with photographic evidence. The height given here is from a Russian 1:100,000 topographic map.


 

Pumari Chhish

Overview
Elevation (feet) 24,580
Elevation (meters) 7,492
Range Hispar Muztagh, Karakoram
Country Pakistan
Continent Asia
Year first climbed 1979 by S. Chiba, K. Minami, M. Ohashi, H. Yokoyama (Japanese)
Easiest route Northwest Ridge: glacier / snow / ice climb
Description

Pumari Chhish, (or Pumarikish, Peak 11) is a high peak of the Hispar Muztagh, a subrange of the Karakoram range. It lies about 4km east of Khunyang Chhish, in the heart of the Hispar, north of the Hispar Glacier.

Pumari Chhish was first attempted by an Austrian group in 1974, who failed to climb or bypass the Yazghil Glacier on the north side of the peak. In 1979, a Japanese group from the Hokkaido Alpine Association succeeded in climbing the mountain via a long route starting from the Khunyang Glacier, well to the west of the peak. They first had to cross a significant col to access the upper Yazghil Glacier; they then ascended the north ridge of Pumari Chhish.


 

Yukshin Gardan Sar

Overview
Elevation (feet) 24,704
Elevation (meters) 7,530
Range Hispar Muztagh, Karakoram
Country Pakistan
Continent Asia
Year first climbed June 26, 1984 by Willi Bauer, Walter Bergmayr, Willi Brandecker, Reinhard Streif (Austrian)
Easiest route South Ridge: glacier / snow / ice climb
Description

Yukshin Gardan Sar is a high peak of the Hispar Muztagh, a subrange of the Karakoram range. Its height is also often given as 7,469 m (24,505 ft) or 7,641 m (25,069 ft). It lies about 15 km (9 mi) northeast of Khunyang Chhish and 5 km (3 mi) northwest of Kanjut Sar. It is flanked on the northwest by the Yazghil Glacier and on the northeast by the Yukshin Gardan Glacier; both drain into the Shimshal River.

Yukshin Gardan Sar was first climbed in 1984, by a Pakistani-Austrian group, led by Rudolf Wurzer. They ascended via the South Ridge, which they accessed via the Yazghil Glacier on the west side of the peak.

The second ascent followed very shortly after the first, on July 23, 1984. A Pakistani-Japanese group that had been on the mountain simultaneously with the first ascent party switched from their unworkable North Ridge route to make an alpine style ascent of the first ascent route on the South Ridge.

The third ascent of the peak was in 1986, by a Spanish team comprising Alejandro Arranz, Inaki Aldaya, Alfredo Zabalza, and Tomás Miguel. They used the same route as the first-ascent party. According to the Himalayan Index, there have been no other ascents or attempts on this peak since that time.



















 

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